How to save money on your architect’s fees

I know what you are thinking. I wonder how much this is all going to cost? Well, preparing a fee for a new client is a tricky business and reading through a fee proposal can be a nervous moment. Here’s some help for you.

The easiest way to save money on your architect’s fees is to hire someone with no insurance, who doesn’t pay tax and is not on the Register of Architects. Thanks for stopping by, have a nice day.

If you have decided to look for someone who is honest, there is a lot you can do to save money on your fees. Here we go:

1. Decide what you want.

If you ask for a fee from an architect to come up with some ideas for your home, how will she or he price this? You can learn a great deal from your architect, who is an expert in design, problem solving, knows about construction and can develop the project requirements into a brief to deliver real benefits to you. If that is what you need, great. But if you know that you are looking for a garden office with a composting toilet and solar panels, say so. Show the architect what you have done already to identify your requirements and solve the problems. If you have a builder on board, tell them. Help your architect to price only the work you need done.

2. Decide how much service you need.

Many of my clients ask for a full service, which means I am with them from the initial sketches through to settling the final account with the builder. That’s a lot of service. If you only need planning and building regulations approval, say so. If you are not sure ask for prices for both. Ask your architect to explain what she or he will do and decide for yourself if that is money well spent.

3. If you want a lump sum fee, say so.

There are three main ways for the architect to price your work. You can pay a percentage of the final build cost. This should be somewhere between 8% and 15% for a small project with a full service. I tend to avoid this with small projects as it is pretty hard to work out what the fee will be, especially if we don’t get to site. You can pay an hourly rate, which has low risk for the architect, but can give the client the shivers, even though this is usually the cheapest fee. Ask your architect to show you the time allowances and the rates and make sure that you don’t ask for too many changes. If you ask for a lump sum fee, you are asking for a fixed price service. The fee might not be the lowest but you know what you will pay for each stage of the works.

4. Start with a feasibility.

For many of my clients, cost is the test of the scheme. If the scheme is too much, it won’t get built and the architect fees will have gone for nothing. Ask your architect to do a feasibility with a guide price. Your architect will probably ask for an hourly rate so that she can be protected in case the service requirements grow out of hand. Ask for an hour limit, say twenty or thirty hours for the feasibility. Once you have it, ask for a lump sum for the rest of the service. Much of the work will have been done already – the plan, the brief, the site visit, so the lump sum should be a lot less. You may get back more than you have already spent.

5. Ask for a reference.

It may seem counter intuitive, but if you want value from your architect, find out how good their service is by getting some references. Have you ever taken your car to the garage and then decided to go elsewhere next time? You usually only get one shot at an architect, who is responsible for designing and delivering your project with the best result, the least stress and no nasty surprises on site. You may wonder why a set of drawings might cost more than a good German washing machine, but if your scheme gets finished on time, to the agreed contract sum you have gained something worth thousands of pounds, all thanks to one person.

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